ANGLICARE PNG INC. ADULT LITERACY PROGRAM JIMI TEACHERS REFRESHER WORKSHOP,2015

By Aquino Saklo

Manager Adult Literacy Program (POM), Facilitator

The initial Refresher Workshop was conducted in Mt. Hagen Anglican Diocese of Aipo Rongo. Participants involved in the training workshop were the Jimi Adult literacy teachers from the Jiwaka Province, with a total of 22 participants including two from the Hagen parish. It was a 5 days of intense training with the first day taken up by going through the church structure aligning with the Literacy program and Anglicare PNG Inc.

A challenging five days for the majority of the participants representing their various literacy schools establishment but evident was the curiosity that embrace the participants because the majority of them present were total strangers to the theme of the workshop or training as most of the subjects covered were totally new to them, but it was their hunger. It was the information they have been longing for, thus they were really to receive all of them in a very simple and more understanding way.
The workshop ended successfully on the fifth day with an official closure by Anglicare National Director, Heni Meke and Mt. Hagen Anglicare Branch Manager, Cliff Rombok.
All participants graduated with a certificate that certify them to be Adult Literacy teachers, who understand the reason of being an adult literacy teacher and have the heart to work with the needy and feel the joy of seeing someone grow, from not reading and writing to be able to read and write and appreciate life as well as participate in bringing change to the community.

SUMMARY

After the five days training/workshop, the participants’ level of attainment assuming would have improved from observation even though a lot still need to be done. Sufficiently they would have improve, enhancing and broadening their horizon and hopefully they would be in a better position to deliver a bit more effectively.

As for the facilitator, it was a job well done in terms of covering all the necessary subjects needed to be covered and every teachers involved should be acknowledged. Also the coordinator who always at hand to assist in meeting the demands that arose. Our combined efforts and professionalism displayed created and aura of mutual correlation in signifying our reputation.

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Anglicare Popondetta Celebrates 10 Years with launch of it’s newsletter

Anglicare PNG Inc . Popondetta Office is proud that it has served the people and communities of Popondetta for the last ten years. The Office as part of it’s existence has produced a newsletter as a sign of the  ten years in operation and will see through the next three working quarters that the publication progresses, serving out 3 more issues, one per quarter with this being the first. Please click on link to access the newsletter.

APNG Popondetta Newsletter 2015

Dipoturu adult literacy schools graduands with Anglicare Popondetta literacy team and community development officer from the Oro Provincial Administration posing for photograph

Dipoturu adult literacy schools graduands with Anglicare Popondetta literacy team and community development officer from the Oro Provincial Administration posing for photograph

 

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APTC students attached with APNG POM

 

Meshach. Feke. Maomaigiso busy during work attachment at Anglicare POM, March, 2015.

Meshach. Feke. Maomaigiso busy during work attachment at Anglicare POM, March, 2015.

Meshach. Feke (Feke means Aim/Goal in the Malaita Language) Maomaigiso is a student of the Australia Pacific Technical College (APTC) POM TECH Idubada Campus here in Port Moresby.

Meshach hails from the Solomon Islands in a place full of natural resources called Kibelifolu Village in the Auke Langa Langa Constituency (50), Malaita Province.

His field of study Community Services (Governance Structure), is more in relation to the governance of natural resources. He is very much interested in the preservation and proper use of natural resources and with the knowledge he receives here. He will put to use in the Solomon after graduating from APTC. Apart from Meshach there are two other students also attached with Anglicare POM Branch under the VCCT, WASH and HIV/CS Programs respectively.

College Address: APTC POMTECH

Baruni Road Idubada

NCD,PNG

P.O.BOX 1043 – 321 3668/

studentservices@aptc.edu.au

http://aptc.edu.au/index.php/contact-us

 

 

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APNG 2015 Quarter 1 Newsletter

To our valued followers please click on the link below to access our Quarter one (1) Bulletin for 2015. Happy reading !!!!!

QTR 1,2015neWsletter

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PNGDEV NEWS CONTENTS

MEDIA WATCH | HEALTH UP-DATE | JUST A THOUGHT | FROM THE MEMBERS |LINK OF THE WEEK | ATPROJECTS NEWS | POSITIONS VACANT | NOTICES |EVENTS | VIEWPOINT| TECHNOLOGY UPDATE | FROM THE BUSH | WEEKLY FEATURE | WEB SITE ADDRESSES | SPECIAL NOTICES

Started in 2000, and is one of PNG’s oldest development newsletters. PNGDEV NEWS now has a circulation of 1,092 members, with an estimated readership of 4,368. ATprojects Inc. funds this newsletter so if you wish to support PNGDEV NEWS any contribution would be most welcome. Contributions can be sent to PNGDEV NEWS, PO Box 660, Goroka, and Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea.

MEDIA WATCH |
ADVISER: POPULATION BOOM A REAL WORRY |By Nellie Setepano Papua New Guinea’s population is growing with about 140,000 births every year, says women’s health technical adviser Dr Lahui Geita. Dr Geita likened that to creating a new province annually. Dr Geita told a women’s forum in Port Moresby yesterday that the national population rate is already having an adverse effect on scarce public services and one did not have to go far to see. There is an increase that the number of people on the streets and bus stops, equally large number of city children were on the street begging as street kids. Mothers are neglecting children who begged or fended for themselves, he said, adding that schools are overcrowded with many children sitting on the floor. These are some of the many signs of rapid population increase, he said. Dr Lahui, one of the panelists who were discussing the ‘role of family planning in empowering women’ wants women, girls and couples to make responsible choices on family planning to control the number of children they want. Another panelist Professor Glen Mola told the forum that family planning is critical for the future of PNG. “Every pregnancy needs to be planned. We get hung up by numbers,” Prof Mola said. He suggested that having four or more children could be challenging for any average income earner. “One is alright, two is a good number and three would be okay. Four is off the limit.” Prof Mola said there should be limits on numbers and people should help to advocate on the number of children that a family should have. He said lack of communication is a problem and will continue to be a problem in advocating family planning.| Source: Post-Courier 12th March 2015

CHILD ABUSE A GLOBAL ISSUE, UN AGENCY OFFICIAL SAYS Child abuse is a global issue and not confined to any one country such as Papua New Guinea, a United Nations agency official says. United Nations Children Fund director Susan Bissell from New York, said in Mt Hagen, Western Highlands, yesterday, it meant that the global community needed to address and fight against it together. Bissell told a refresher workshop on the Lukautim Pikinini Act attended by village court officials and magistrates in Hagen district that the problem was experienced everywhere. “It is happening everywhere and I’m calling on each and every one globally and locally to come together and do something to protect the rights of children. It will need every stakeholder to contribute and make sure that child abuse is controlled and that is what that has to be done. I see that in PNG the village court officials are doing fine job in carrying out awareness in remote communities,” she said. Bissell was accompanied by UNICEF director in Bangkok Steven Blight, UNICEF chief child protection Aseta Danno and UNICEF assistant representative in PNG, Vatina Geezant Terant. Blight said he was happy that officials from the 16 village courts in Hagen district attended the workshop. He said it would help promote the Lukautim Pikinini Act. |Source: The National, 11th March 2015

LACK OF DATA A PROBLEM
A Database is an area of need in Papua New Guinea to address gender-based violence, Secretary for Community Development Anna Solomon said. Speaking on a panel discussion on “Combating Sexual Violence Against Children” during the PNG Women’s Forum yesterday, Solomon said there was a need for a gender-based council similar to the National AIDS Council. “This would help handle all the challenges to do with database and data collection on all forms of violence in the country,” she said. The lack of data problem was shared by other panelists who said that it was an impediment to research on violence by agencies and stakeholders. The problems have always been there but lack of any concrete data and information has hampered any research into the root causes of violence in the country. Solomon said she wanted to see gender-based violence addressed at the national level, thus she had been pushing for the coordination of all partners who had been working towards child protection. She said there was a gender-based violence strategy which had not gone to Parliament for deliberation. “Every household has experienced violence, unlike HIV/AIDS. So this calls for immediate recognition to have the mechanism (gender-based council) which can’t be crowded under the department (Community Development),” she said. She said her department had been pushing for this and hoped to get the nod from the national executive council to address the issue of database and data collection in the country. “We must get this right otherwise our efforts in addressing violence against children will not be heard or seen, thus get no support from the Government,” she said. Solomon said besides the proposed gender-based council, the Lukautim Pikinini Act called for a council. The PNG Law Reform Commission said 70 per cent of women in the country said they had been physically abused by their husbands. That number reaches 100 per cent in some parts of the country or even more than that, she said. Source: The National, 12th March 2015

GROUP ATTENDS UN MEETING ON WOMEN
A DELEGATION of public servants is in New York at the invitation of the United Nations to attend the session of the Commission on the Status of Women. PNG, Guatemala and Argentina were chosen on their work on gender-based violence. The work includes the new SMS-alert system for violence victims and the gender-based violence database system. The SMS-alert system will connect human rights defenders from the communities to family sexual violence action committee secretariats in the provinces. Through the free of charge SMS-system, human rights defenders will be able to send requests for urgent assistance. The secretariats will be available 24/7 and will provide support to the victims. The GBV service database will collect reported cases and identify bottlenecks, monitor the response rates and provide insights. The delegation is headed by John Kali, the Department of Personnel Management Secretary. Other officers are from the Department of Community Development and Religion, Family and Sexual Violence Action Committee. The delegation will meet UN Special rapporteur on violence against women Rashida Manjoo. Meanwhile, the session was opened yesterday by UN General-Seretary Ban Ki-Moon. Ban said to reach the goal of equality for women by the year 2030, the key was getting men to change their “mind-sets.” He said while more girls were being educated, women and girls still suffered disproportionately. |Source: The National, Wednesday March 11th, 2015 PARTNERS INK DEAL ON NEW COURSE AN agreement was signed yesterday between the School of Natural and Physical Science and the National Disaster Centre to introduce a new Diploma in Comprehensive Hazard Assessment and Risk Management (CHARM) programme. The course nicknamed CHARM will be offered to students from this year. University of PNG Vice-Chancellor Professor Chalapan Kaluwin said that the course was purposefully to educate people on how to deal with the effects of natural disasters and climate changes in the country. “We want to develop people’s understanding of how they can live and address the natural disasters and climate changes in the country so that they can live sustainably, even after the effects of disasters and climate changes,” Kaluwin said. He thanked the PNG National Disaster Centre and the Department of Provincial Local Level Government Affairs (DPLLGA) for their support. National Disaster Centre acting director Martin Mose said that it was a commitment by the centre to provide technical advisory services and disseminate information on Disaster Risk Management and other related topics along with support staff to the University of PNG. A joint understanding between the two organisations since 2012 to which K50, 000 was initially provided by the PNG National Disaster Centre and the Department of Provincial Local Level Government Affairs (DPLLGA) last year helped to introduce the new course. Secretary for the Department of Provincial Local Level Government Affairs Munare Uyassi said that the department was happy to train young people to have better skill and knowledge to address and manage disasters. | Source: The National, Thursday March 12th, 2015

SEXUAL VIOLENCE STATS ALARMING | By Nellie Setepano ALARMING statistics of sexual violence cases have been reported by provincial authorities in Western Highlands during the past three years. More children had been reportedly abused than adults, statistics showed, adding there could be more but stigma and discrimination had prevented victims from reporting to authorities, a women’s forum was told. According to a clinical supervisor from Western Highlands Provincial Health Authority, in 2012 there were 301 reported case of sexual violence in the province, of which 222 were children and 88 adults. In 2013, 330 cases were reported, 220 of them were children and the rest are adults who reported to clinics. Last year, the authority reported 145 children and 57 adult cases of sexual violence. Sister Edith Namba, a clinical supervisor, was among discussion panelists on the topic “combating sexual violence against children”, said yesterday that many cases did not get reported because of stigma and discrimination. | Source: Post-Courier 12th March 2015 GENDER INEQUALITY MARGINALISING WOMEN Gender equality is marginalising women in Papua New Guinea in terms of key government priority areas, Consultative Implementation and Monitoring Council (CIMC) executive director Wallis Yakam says. However, Yakam said women should not give up hope but work towards establishing ways to strengthen their rights. Speaking during the second PNG Women’s Forum co-hosted by the US Embassy and Department for Community Development this week in Port Moresby, Yakam said gender-based violence was an issue in the country and should be addressed at a higher level to really look at the state of violence against women. “Now that we have the forum here with international partners trying to address the issue with government, the government is now taking good progress with policy and legislative initiatives,” Yakam said. She said there was no coordinated effort specifically for women, with central agencies doing their own thing and nothing tied up in the budget. “There is nothing for women in the annual budget. For example, the National Council of Women – there is nothing for women,” she said. Yakam said if the government was serious about addressing gender equality and gender-based violence, it should provide support in terms of allocating funds for women in the annual budgets and provide capacity and incentives for them. She said institutions that dealt with gender and gender-related issues should be elevated to a level where they were given recognition by the government so that coordination and management were strengthened. She said with the new Office for Development of Women, women leaders should stand together and take the Government initiative seriously if they were serious about addressing equality instead of working in isolation. |Source: The National, 11th March, 2015

HEALTH UP-DATE |
HEALTH WORKERS NEEDED | By Nellie Setepano East Sepik Province is in dire need of 500 health workers and specialist doctors, says Boram Hospital board chairman Allan Bird. The hospital has operated with just nine doctors for a long time. “I am happy to say that we are up to 13 doctors now and four are arriving in the next few months,” Mr Bird said. He said the hospital serves 500,000 people of the province, parts of West Sepik and the Highlands provinces as well. Despite its rundown state and understaffing, the hospital continues to provide help to people. Mr Bird said with the K24 million proposed for Boram rehabilitation announced by Health Minister Michael Malabag during a recent visit, the hospital would continue to improve. Giving the status of the hospital, the chairman said the hospital was in the process of rebuilding and welcomed interested health workers to the province. He added that the plans to build a nursing college would go along to improving health manpower in the province. “We lack so much health workers, not only at Boram but right across East Sepik Province,” he said. Mr Bird, who had been chairman for only eight months, said with hospital acting chief executive officer in place, Boram had restored good governance and accountability. He assured the Government that the K24 million rehabilitation funds would be parked at the hospital accounts. Mr Bird said prior to his appointment, there had been reported malpractices at the hospital for a long time and these claims had been submitted to the auditor-general. He said it was time to restore public confidence. | Source: Post-Courier 09th March 2015

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TRAINING FOR STUDENTS | By Maureen Gerawa Lack of vital information on sexual reproductive health and many other areas has given rise to many issues among young people. Thus, ChildFund Papua New Guinea, a non-government organisation which has been operating in Gulf and Central provinces, has initiated a project for young people on improving access to sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services in Central Province. Its second training under this project was conducted recently in partnership with Young Women’s Christian Association for 14 secondary schools and vocational centres. The training was from February 27 to March 3, and attended by 12 youth leaders and peer educators. YWCA facilitators, Sam Maila, Naomi Woyengu and Alex Tanabi, conducted training on SRH, HIV, human rights, gender issues, leadership and public speaking. ChildFund has a plan to have a follow-up training for more young people next year. It was noted that the facilitators were excited about going out to share the information with other young people in their schools and communities. | Source: Post-Courier 13th March 2015

DIABETES, HYPERTENSION CAUSES FOR KIDNEY FAILURE The leading cause of kidney failure seen at the Port Moresby General Hospital is diabetes and hypertension (high blood pressure). Both need serious attention, Dr Steven Bogasia, the hospital’s physician, said. Diabetes leads to many problems like heart failure, he said. Bogasia has been seeing many patients dying when their kidneys fail to function. “When the kidney fails, we offer palliative care, meaning we couldn’t’t do much to help the patient because to have the problem solved was to have a brand new kidney replacement, and available through kidney donors. And the replacement of the new kidney is done through surgery and it’s done overseas. If you go to Australia, you’re looking at almost half-a-million kina for kidney replacement. If you go to the Philippines or Singapore, it is K300, 000– K400, 000 alone for surgery and then you have other costs for treatment and you need to reside in those countries for follow-up treatment. Many times when we tell this to patients, it’s like giving them a final death note on the bed and many of them look depressed. We cannot do much but watch them die in the ward,” he said. Bogasia was a doctor-in-charge of a newly established non-governmental organisation, the PNG Kidney Foundation. |Source: The National, 10th March 2015

JUST A THOUGHT |
FROM THE MEMBERS |

LINK OF THE WEEK |

BLOGS TO WATCH|
http://www.atprojects-png.org/blogs
http://www.onemanthinkingallowed.wordpress.com
http://www.anglicarepngincblog.wordpress.com

ATPROJECTS NEWS |
ATPROJECTS STAFF ATTEND PERSONAL FINANCE COURSE | By Verolyn Frank A total of 34 ATprojects employees have attended a two days intensive course on Personal Finance Management at the National Appropriate Technology Centre last month. The course was to help and teach the staff on how to save and manage their income in order to meet their daily needs and to achieve their dreams in life. The course was facilitated by Hariah Frank, the head of the Accounts section and assisted by two accounts officers, Wolder Wifa and Yolanda Namo. The course was conducted in TokPisin targeting the TokPisin speakers. The English version of the course was conducted last year targeting English speakers and was facilitated by ATprojects Co-Director, Steve Layton. ATprojects Co-Director Steve Layton said this was part of Capacity Building for its employees to help them to be financially independent. Most employees are locals from the Nagamiza area and the course aimed at teaching them to improve their living standards and to achieve their long term plans. The course helped them to identify areas where they have been spending a lot of their income on. Everyone who attended the workshop was very pleased and thanked the local NGO for such an opportunity. Silas Simba, one of the ATprojects staff said the course will help him and his family to work towards archiving his dream.
He said that he should have attended the course a long time ago, adding that if he had done so he would have been half way through to achieving his dream. He said although he had lived half of his life already, he will try his very best to practice what he has learnt.
The Personal Finance course is one of ATprojects program that mostly targets low and average income earners to be financially independent to meet their daily needs and to achieve their dreams regardless of how much they earn. | Source : ATprojects Media Unit, 13th March 2013

POSITIONS VACANT |
TITLE Country Representative – Papua New Guinea SALARY Competitive INGO package LOCATION Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

EMPLOYMENT BASIS 3 years (subject to a 6 month probationary period) START DATE End of May 2015

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 31st March 2015

WaterAid is seeking to recruit a highly motivated individual with exceptional leadership skills to fill the position of Country Representative in Papua New Guinea (PNG). WaterAid is committed to supporting the Government of PNG to reach universal access to sanitation, hygiene and water and the Country Representative will lead development and implementation of our strategy.

Overview
WaterAid Australia works within a federated international NGO structure, and is the WaterAid international member responsible for managing country programs in South East Asia and the Pacific. WaterAid Australia has two established country programs, in Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea (PNG) and new programs are under development in Cambodia and the Solomon Islands. Through several key Australian Government grants, WaterAid Australia also supports a number of WASH programs in South Asia and Africa.

Accountabilities
1. Represent WaterAid externally; ensuring that WaterAid’s vision, mission, values and aims are communicated in a positive and compelling way.

2. Facilitate the building of relationships between government, private sector and non-government partners, staff and other stakeholders.

3. In line with WaterAid’s global strategy, built on current analysis of WASH situation in PNG to implement a Country Strategy with a strong emphasis on advocacy and influencing.

4. Recruit, lead, manage and develop the CP team, creating an environment that enables staff to maximise their potential.

5. Ensure the successful, on time, delivery of multi-year plans and budgets. Identify future funding sources for the PNG Country Program.

6. Lead the approach to ensuring that the CP has integrated gender, equity and inclusion into its work as well as being a diverse and inclusive place to work.

7. Actively facilitate relationships between WASH sector stakeholders and actors in other related sectors (such as health and education) to support the development of the sector.

8. Work in close collaboration with the Melbourne head office, in particular with the Regional Programs Manager and the Director of International Programs.

9. Collaborate with colleagues from across WaterAid to enhance relationships and ensure effective organisational working.

10. Contribute as a member of Global and Australian leadership teams of WaterAid to support organisational development; fundraising initiatives and community engagement activities

11. Develop a thorough understanding of the external environment we are operating in, identify and manage risk including ensuring appropriate health and safety and security procedures are in place.

12. Ensure that WaterAid’s global policies are adapted to the country context (as appropriate) and adhered to; represent WaterAid’s stated global positions on key development issues effectively, adapting them to the country context as appropriate.

Education
Essential Desirable
• Degree or professional qualification in a relevant subject, • Qualification in international development • Post graduate qualification in a related subject • WASH related qualifications Closing date: 31st March 2015 (5pm Australian Eastern Standard Time)

Applications for this role must comprise of:
• An application letter addressing the Essential Criteria outlined above (maximum 2 pages) • A curriculum vitae (maximum 4 pages). The CV must include three professional referees (referees will not be contacted until after interviews, with permission from the candidate).

If you would like further information about this position you can contact Mrs Nancy Haino-Valahu on 3254535. Interested candidates who meet the above requirements are to submit their applications to: nancy.hainovalahu@wateraid.org.au by close of business 31st March, 2015.

For detailed job description and recruitment information refer the WaterAid Australia website:
http://atprojects-png.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=996ceb0355222fb820fb1ba41&id=f47d801849&e=1f97bc9208

VIEW POINT |

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK |
I always enjoy getting your newsletter, (though the writing seems to be getting smaller and denser as I get older!). But I am sometimes concerned about the articles taken direct from newspapers with little analysis or comment. The second-to-last article (from Post-Courier) in your 6th March issue is an example of what I mean: PUSH FOR CROP DIVERSIFICATION. It sounds like a good thing for remote areas of ENB province doesn’t it? However, if you know the context, and the struggles that the people in the Baining and coastal areas of Open Bay have had with logging companies, aided sometimes by corrupt local officials, the proposed development of large scale agro-forestry is not so benign – as people elsewhere in ENB such as Pomio, can testify. Now that it is becoming harder for Asian logging companies to get legal permits to clear-fell primary forests, there is often an attempt to ‘dress up’ such forestry projects as ‘agro-forestry’ with the promise of planting oil palm, rubber, or some other crops to make people ‘rich’. Some of the 99 year SABLs leases have been found to circumvent PNG’s strong land laws, and are considered a foreign ‘land grab’ subject to an independent investigation. The real aim of these schemes is to make a lot of money out of logging pristine forest, and the companies involved rarely if ever, fulfill the stated aims of diversifying crops, or bringing long-term sustainable agriculture to the devastated lands they leave behind. The promised infrastructure, such as roads, fails to materialize, as temporary, poorly designed roads made for extracting timber, quickly deteriorate and return to muddy impassable tracks. The monoculture of oil palm cropping has adverse affects on both the local environment, on local landowners who have lost precious resources, and on the countries to which palm oil/kernels is exported, encouraging as it does, industrialization of farming practices in places like Australia and New Zealand. Either the Dept of Environment and “Conservation’ and Provincial Administration are being naive, or they have failed to learn from Pomio and other areas of ENB which have been logged for little benefit to local people, and who have suffered years of conflict over this issue. Locals protesting the destruction on their forest for two palm oil plantations have been terrorized by the police, beaten up and locked in shipping containers, bankrolled by the Malaysian logging company Rimbunan Hijau. I know that ATProjects’ newsletter has a disclaimer at the end, saying that not all the views expressed are those of the organization. However, with something as important as this, I think some ‘development’ commentary is necessary to fulfill your purpose in putting out the newsletter. Keep up the good work…..it’s a great source of information for many of us.
Wendy Lee

We’d love to get your feedback. We want to find out a little more about our readership, your opinion of the PNGDEV news service and your point of view about some topics. Please send your feedback to: info@atprojects-png.org

NOTICES |
DWU GRADUATION SET
Divine Word University is gearing up for it annual graduation ceremony at its Madang campus this Sunday 15th March where 764 students are expected to graduate. The small town of Madang is bracing for an influx of visitors for the ceremony which usually sees all hotels, lodges and guest houses booked out for the graduation weekend. The students graduating at the Madang campus would add to the 907 students who passed out of DWU’s amalgamated and affiliated campuses around the country, bringing the total for the 2014 academic year. This brings the total to 1670 graduates to have attained qualifications from DWU. The graduation ceremonies in the amalgamated and affiliated campuses took place towards the end of last year. The graduation on Sunday will feature students passing out of the full-time programs, part-time flexible learning programs and new nursing officers from the Lutheran School of Nursing in Madang, which is an affiliate of DWU. Twelve Solomon Islands students who studied through the flexible learning mode are expected to fly across to Madang from Honiara to graduate in person. The keynote speaker at the graduation will be the Ambassador of Japan to PNG, His Excellency Morio Matsumoto while the Ambassador of the Holy See, ApostolicNuncio His Excellency Most Reverend Archbishop Michael Wallace Banach will be the guest speaker. | Source: Post-Courier 11th March 2015

EVENTS |

TECHNOLOGY UPDATE |
SPC SUSTAINABLE ENERGY PARTNERSHIP BRINGS LIGHT AND LIVELIHOODS
Two villages in the Oro Province of Papua New Guinea, home to some 1200 people, began to enjoy the benefits of electricity over the weekend, thanks to their partnership with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) and a non-governmental organisation (NGO). Melanesia’s Million Miracle Partnership (M3P) is a launching pad for partnerships between community-based NGOs, government energy offices and local communities, especially women’s groups, to bring electricity to one million people in Melanesia (Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) by 2020. For Papua New Guinea, M3P aims to provide electricity to 82,500 households or 495,000 people by 2020. As an M3P partner, SPC sent a team from its Energy Programme to Papua New Guinea from 28 February to 13 March to install and commission a 12 Volt DC off-grid solar photovoltaic (PV) charging system for Kou Kou and Gorari villages. This, with 200 Solar Pico lanterns, will bring electricity to both villages, which are located along the Kokoda Track. The project is a collaboration of the Government of Australia and SPC working in partnership with the Kokoda Track Foundation (KTF) and the two communities. It was jointly commissioned by SPC and its project partners on 7 March 2015. One of the community leaders said, “My people are appreciative of SPC’s support and its partnership with KTF to bring this project to my community; this will provide solar lights right at the doorstep of my people. In the past we normally use firewood for cooking and also lights in the night. With the Solar Pico lanterns, we will have access to good quality lights and improve the livelihoods of my people.” This partnership serves to empower the women’s groups in Kou Kou and Gorari villages to effectively manage community-based micro businesses. They will run solar shops that serve as charging stations for the Solar Pico lanterns. The women leaders from both villages showed their appreciation. “This project is a blessing to the women; we will be able to earn money from the sale of solar lanterns and charging of the lanterns and also learn important business skills to operate the solar shop successfully. The project will improve the livelihoods of our families and empower the women in the area to run a small community business. The lights will improve the security of our families and also help our children complete their homework and study at night.” Kuini Rabo, officer in charge of M3P, said, “We are pleased to empower the women of Kou Kou and Gorari on the eve of the International Women’s Day. The M3P partnership was designed to empower women because we strongly believe in this year’s theme – Make it Happen – and no doubt these women’s groups will make it happen.” The women will receive basic business and technical training from SPC and KTF staff. Similar projects are planned for Solomon Islands and Vanuatu in the coming months, and a hydro-electricity power supply project for 215 households in Papua New Guinea is in the pipeline. Source: Post-Courier 12th March 2015

SOLAR PLANE BEGINS EPIC JOURNEY
A record-breaking attempt to fly around the world in a solar-powered plane has got under way from Abu Dhabi. The aircraft – called Solar Impulse-2 – took off from the Emirate, heading east to Muscat in Oman. Over the next five months, it will skip from continent to continent, crossing both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans in the process. Andre Borschberg was at the controls of the single-seater vehicle as it took off at 07:12 local time (03:12 GMT). He will share the pilot duties in due course with fellow Swiss, Bertrand Piccard. The plan is stop off at various locations around the globe, to rest and to carry out maintenance, and also to spread a campaigning message about clean technologies. Before taking off, Borschberg told BBC News: “I am confident we have a very special aeroplane, and it will have to be to get us across the big oceans. We may have to fly for five days and five nights to do that, and it will be a challenge. But we have the next two months, as we fly the legs to China, to train and prepare ourselves.” -BBC news. | Source: Post-Courier 10th March 2015

FROM THE BUSH |

WEEKLY FEATURE |

The above articles reflect a view of development that we are sure is not shared by everyone, but PNGDEV NEWS feels that everyone’s voice should be heard if we are going to truly develop. If you have any views on the above article why not share them with us by writing to info@atprojects-png.org

WEB SITE ADDRESSES | Oxfam International | http://www.oxfam.org.nz |ADRA PNG | http://www.adra.org.pg
|Anglican Health Service | Rural Airstrip Agency of PNG Limited [RAA] |
|www.raa.com.pg |www.facebook.com/RuralAirstripAgencyofPNGLimited |
|www.ahs-png.org ATprojects | http://www.atprojects-png.org ATCDI
||www.ngo.org.pg/atcdi ACIL | http://www.acil.com.au Australian
||Business|education.gov.pg/QL_HIVandAIDS/hivaids/health-promoting-schoo
|ls-teacher-guide.pdf|
|http://atprojects-png.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=996ceb0355222f
|b820fb1ba41&id=6045bf2d78&e=1f97bc9208
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Anglicare Life Skills Program interests the Pacific

The three (3) Fijian Women who were part of the initial APNG Life Skills Training in Sewing

The three (3) Fijian Women who were part of the initial APNG Life Skills Training in Sewing. (L-R) Mareta Saun, Aquino Saklo Adult LiteracyProgrm Manager,  Mere Mainakavika, Emma the sewing facilitator, Selaima Smith,and Imelda Saka Literacy Coordinator POM.

LIFE SKILLS PARTICIPANTS from Fiji- A brief Experience of the training from the participants

Name: Mere Mainakavika
Age:
32
Level of Education:
College
Marital Status:
Married
Home Province:
Fiji

I found out about the course from one of a relative who got married to PNG. I always wanted to sew and always thinking that one day somewhere I will attend a sewing program/course. The reason is I wanted to sew my kids and husband clothes. In my country, they sew beautiful clothes where I myself don’t even know to sew the patterns, until now that I have this opportunity to attend this program, I feel my dream has been fulfilled somehow.

I have never gone to any sewing training before and I have no experience at all but thanks to Anglicare and the Life Skills program that made everything that possible for me. I can now be able to sew, cut patterns of different clothes both male and females patterns. I feel I am satisfied that I can now sew as I used to dream off. Thank you Anglicare, and Thank you for your service.

Name: Selaima Smith
Age:
39
Level of Education:
College
Marital Status:
married
Home Province:
Fiji

Hi,

My name is Selaima and I found out about the program from a wantok, Mere who got married to PNG and has been in PNG for some years. I was very interested to attend the program so I can sew my own Fijian cultural shirts because they are too expensive to buy, that is why I decided to register after hearing about the program.

I am a college graduate but I had no idea of sewing. I never even attended such training before but had little skills learned from Grade 10 Home Economics kind of make me give a try during my leisure times at home.

I must say I learnt so much during this two weeks of training. I learned skills such as cutting and sewing as well as the mechanism of the sewing machine. The training just give me motivation to keep sewing. I feel like buying a sewing machine right after the training and start sewing for my family. I feel I have achieve something. Thank you to Anglicare.

 

Name: Mareta Saun
Age: 39
Level of Education:
Tertiary Institution
Marital Status:
Married
Home Province
: Fiji

I found out about the course/program in 2014 through a friend who was once a student here at Anglicare. I was really interested because I love sewing, so I got myself registered program.

I got married to PNG and my husband is working while I am in the house. My husband is a good man but I don’t want to depend on him every time, therefore this prompted me to learn to sew, the skills I love. I haven’t gone through such training before and don’t have much experience, just little that I can remember from my high school Home Economics class.

I have learn a lot so much within the two weeks. I am really pleased with the skills I learn, and now I am thinking of buying myself a sewing machine and start sewing. Thanks to my teacher, she has been too good and help me a lot.

 

 

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Servanthood and Leadership Training : Don Bosco Technical School Gabutu help to beautify Anglicare

Port Moresby – Servanthood and Leadership Training : Don Bosco Technical School Gabutu help to beautify Anglicare POM Head Office grounds.
Making a name in a positive manner, showing leadership and keeping the community and environment clean for living and working.
Don Bosco Technical School is a private Catholic educational institution owned and operated by the Salesians of Don Bosco. Recent 42 of its grade students lent a hand to help beautify the Anglicare POM Office and Good Shepherd Church yards.

As part of its spiritual mentoring and educational programs students are sent to respective NGO’s, Community Organizations and other selected venues to conduct a 5 hour community service work. This program is called the Servanthood and Leadership Training or SALT Program. The program is conducted only for the Grade 12 students and the Industrial Training Course Students at the School in Gabutu.

Recently grade 12 Rinadli with the leadership of the Class Patron Mr. Peter of Don Bosco Technical School extended their community service to an NGO here in Waigani, Port Moresby.

Mr. Peter said the school initiates the program in the hope of getting the final year students prepared to face the world outside as a servant leader. “We at the Don Bosco Technical School would like to help our students enhance their skills as a leader in the community through activities as such” he added.

Mr. Peter said that there were 3 grade 12 classes and 5 Industrial Training Course Classes in total and all were spread out in the city to serve different community groups and the Port Moresby General Hospital, of which Anglicare PNG Inc. was one of the selected organizations to be provided with the yard cleaning assistance. His class had a total of 42 young men who under take the general subjects of formal schooling as well as technical subjects.

He added that the SALT Program is an annual event which coincides with their formation activities like school retreats.
The service include trimming of hedges, cutting grass, collection of rubbish and sweeping or raking of fallen leaves and the general beatification within and outside of the premises.

Branch Manager for Anglicare POM Mr. Bernard Paru on behalf of the Organization thanked the students and Don Bosco School for this initiative and expressed that more such activities were welcomed by Anglicare.

DON BOSCO TECHNICAL SCHOOL (DBTS) GABUTU is a technical secondary school which caters for Grades 9 to Grades 12 and also offers Industrial Training Courses.

Students of 12 Rinaldi, Don Bosco Technical School, Gabutu, Zeroman Noru (R) and Sears Binawai are part of a class of 42 students who cleaned up the Anglicare Pom and Good Shepherd yard recently in Port Moresby under the SALT Program.

Students of 12 Rinaldi, Don Bosco Technical School, Gabutu, Zeroman Noru (R) and Sears Binawai are part of a class of 42 students who cleaned up the Anglicare Pom and Good Shepherd yard recently in Port Moresby under the SALT Program.

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PNGDEV NEWS CONTENTS:

PNGDEV NEWS CONTENTS:

MEDIA WATCH | HEALTH UP-DATE | JUST A THOUGHT | FROM THE MEMBERS |LINK OF THE WEEK | ATPROJECTS NEWS | POSITIONS VACANT | NOTICES |EVENTS | VIEWPOINT| TECHNOLOGY UPDATE | FROM THE BUSH | WEEKLY FEATURE | WEB SITE ADDRESSES | SPECIAL NOTICES

 

Started in 2000, and is one of PNG’s oldest development newsletters. PNGDEV NEWS now has a circulation of 1,092 members, with an estimated readership of 4,368. ATprojects Inc. funds this newsletter so if you wish to support PNGDEV NEWS any contribution would be most welcome. Contributions can be sent to PNGDEV NEWS, PO Box 660, Goroka, and Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea.

 

MEDIA WATCH |

ADVISER: POPULATION BOOM A REAL WORRY |By Nellie Setepano Papua New Guinea’s population is growing with about 140,000 births every year, says women’s health technical adviser Dr Lahui Geita. Dr Geita likened that to creating a new province annually. Dr Geita told a women’s forum in Port Moresby yesterday that the national population rate is already having an adverse effect on scarce public services and one did not have to go far to see. There is an increase that the number of people on the streets and bus stops, equally large number of city children were on the street begging as street kids. Mothers are neglecting children who begged or fended for themselves, he said, adding that schools are overcrowded with many children sitting on the floor. These are some of the many signs of rapid population increase, he said. Dr Lahui, one of the panelists who were discussing the ‘role of family planning in empowering women’ wants women, girls and couples to make responsible choices on family planning to control the number of children they want. Another panelist Professor Glen Mola told the forum that family planning is critical for the future of PNG. “Every pregnancy needs to be planned. We get hung up by numbers,” Prof Mola said. He suggested that having four or more children could be challenging for any average income earner. “One is alright, two is a good number and three would be okay. Four is off the limit.” Prof Mola said there should be limits on numbers and people should help to advocate on the number of children that a family should have. He said lack of communication is a problem and will continue to be a problem in advocating family planning.| Source: Post-Courier 12th March 2015

 

CHILD ABUSE A GLOBAL ISSUE, UN AGENCY OFFICIAL SAYS Child abuse is a global issue and not confined to any one country such as Papua New Guinea, a United Nations agency official says. United Nations Children Fund director Susan Bissell from New York, said in Mt Hagen, Western Highlands, yesterday, it meant that the global community needed to address and fight against it together. Bissell told a refresher workshop on the Lukautim Pikinini Act attended by village court officials and magistrates in Hagen district that the problem was experienced everywhere. “It is happening everywhere and I’m calling on each and every one globally and locally to come together and do something to protect the rights of children. It will need every stakeholder to contribute and make sure that child abuse is controlled and that is what that has to be done. I see that in PNG the village court officials are doing fine job in carrying out awareness in remote communities,” she said. Bissell was accompanied by UNICEF director in Bangkok Steven Blight, UNICEF chief child protection Aseta Danno and UNICEF assistant representative in PNG, Vatina Geezant Terant. Blight said he was happy that officials from the 16 village courts in Hagen district attended the workshop. He said it would help promote the Lukautim Pikinini Act. |Source: The National, 11th March 2015

 

LACK OF DATA A PROBLEM

A Database is an area of need in Papua New Guinea to address gender-based violence, Secretary for Community Development Anna Solomon said. Speaking on a panel discussion on “Combating Sexual Violence Against Children” during the PNG Women’s Forum yesterday, Solomon said there was a need for a gender-based council similar to the National AIDS Council. “This would help handle all the challenges to do with database and data collection on all forms of violence in the country,” she said. The lack of data problem was shared by other panelists who said that it was an impediment to research on violence by agencies and stakeholders. The problems have always been there but lack of any concrete data and information has hampered any research into the root causes of violence in the country. Solomon said she wanted to see gender-based violence addressed at the national level, thus she had been pushing for the coordination of all partners who had been working towards child protection. She said there was a gender-based violence strategy which had not gone to Parliament for deliberation. “Every household has experienced violence, unlike HIV/AIDS. So this calls for immediate recognition to have the mechanism (gender-based council) which can’t be crowded under the department (Community Development),” she said. She said her department had been pushing for this and hoped to get the nod from the national executive council to address the issue of database and data collection in the country. “We must get this right otherwise our efforts in addressing violence against children will not be heard or seen, thus get no support from the Government,” she said. Solomon said besides the proposed gender-based council, the Lukautim Pikinini Act called for a council. The PNG Law Reform Commission said 70 per cent of women in the country said they had been physically abused by their husbands. That number reaches 100 per cent in some parts of the country or even more than that, she said. Source: The National, 12th March 2015

 

GROUP ATTENDS UN MEETING ON WOMEN

A DELEGATION of public servants is in New York at the invitation of the United Nations to attend the session of the Commission on the Status of Women. PNG, Guatemala and Argentina were chosen on their work on gender-based violence. The work includes the new SMS-alert system for violence victims and the gender-based violence database system. The SMS-alert system will connect human rights defenders from the communities to family sexual violence action committee secretariats in the provinces. Through the free of charge SMS-system, human rights defenders will be able to send requests for urgent assistance. The secretariats will be available 24/7 and will provide support to the victims. The GBV service database will collect reported cases and identify bottlenecks, monitor the response rates and provide insights. The delegation is headed by John Kali, the Department of Personnel Management Secretary. Other officers are from the Department of Community Development and Religion, Family and Sexual Violence Action Committee. The delegation will meet UN Special rapporteur on violence against women Rashida Manjoo. Meanwhile, the session was opened yesterday by UN General-Seretary Ban Ki-Moon. Ban said to reach the goal of equality for women by the year 2030, the key was getting men to change their “mind-sets.” He said while more girls were being educated, women and girls still suffered disproportionately. |Source: The National, Wednesday March 11th, 2015 PARTNERS INK DEAL ON NEW COURSE AN agreement was signed yesterday between the School of Natural and Physical Science and the National Disaster Centre to introduce a new Diploma in Comprehensive Hazard Assessment and Risk Management (CHARM) programme. The course nicknamed CHARM will be offered to students from this year. University of PNG Vice-Chancellor Professor Chalapan Kaluwin said that the course was purposefully to educate people on how to deal with the effects of natural disasters and climate changes in the country. “We want to develop people’s understanding of how they can live and address the natural disasters and climate changes in the country so that they can live sustainably, even after the effects of disasters and climate changes,” Kaluwin said. He thanked the PNG National Disaster Centre and the Department of Provincial Local Level Government Affairs (DPLLGA) for their support. National Disaster Centre acting director Martin Mose said that it was a commitment by the centre to provide technical advisory services and disseminate information on Disaster Risk Management and other related topics along with support staff to the University of PNG. A joint understanding between the two organisations since 2012 to which K50, 000 was initially provided by the PNG National Disaster Centre and the Department of Provincial Local Level Government Affairs (DPLLGA) last year helped to introduce the new course. Secretary for the Department of Provincial Local Level Government Affairs Munare Uyassi said that the department was happy to train young people to have better skill and knowledge to address and manage disasters. | Source: The National, Thursday March 12th, 2015

 

SEXUAL VIOLENCE STATS ALARMING | By Nellie Setepano ALARMING statistics of sexual violence cases have been reported by provincial authorities in Western Highlands during the past three years. More children had been reportedly abused than adults, statistics showed, adding there could be more but stigma and discrimination had prevented victims from reporting to authorities, a women’s forum was told. According to a clinical supervisor from Western Highlands Provincial Health Authority, in 2012 there were 301 reported case of sexual violence in the province, of which 222 were children and 88 adults. In 2013, 330 cases were reported, 220 of them were children and the rest are adults who reported to clinics. Last year, the authority reported 145 children and 57 adult cases of sexual violence. Sister Edith Namba, a clinical supervisor, was among discussion panelists on the topic “combating sexual violence against children”, said yesterday that many cases did not get reported because of stigma and discrimination. | Source: Post-Courier 12th March 2015 GENDER INEQUALITY MARGINALISING WOMEN Gender equality is marginalising women in Papua New Guinea in terms of key government priority areas, Consultative Implementation and Monitoring Council (CIMC) executive director Wallis Yakam says. However, Yakam said women should not give up hope but work towards establishing ways to strengthen their rights. Speaking during the second PNG Women’s Forum co-hosted by the US Embassy and Department for Community Development this week in Port Moresby, Yakam said gender-based violence was an issue in the country and should be addressed at a higher level to really look at the state of violence against women. “Now that we have the forum here with international partners trying to address the issue with government, the government is now taking good progress with policy and legislative initiatives,” Yakam said. She said there was no coordinated effort specifically for women, with central agencies doing their own thing and nothing tied up in the budget. “There is nothing for women in the annual budget. For example, the National Council of Women – there is nothing for women,” she said. Yakam said if the government was serious about addressing gender equality and gender-based violence, it should provide support in terms of allocating funds for women in the annual budgets and provide capacity and incentives for them. She said institutions that dealt with gender and gender-related issues should be elevated to a level where they were given recognition by the government so that coordination and management were strengthened. She said with the new Office for Development of Women, women leaders should stand together and take the Government initiative seriously if they were serious about addressing equality instead of working in isolation. |Source: The National, 11th March, 2015

 

HEALTH UP-DATE |

HEALTH WORKERS NEEDED | By Nellie Setepano East Sepik Province is in dire need of 500 health workers and specialist doctors, says Boram Hospital board chairman Allan Bird. The hospital has operated with just nine doctors for a long time. “I am happy to say that we are up to 13 doctors now and four are arriving in the next few months,” Mr Bird said. He said the hospital serves 500,000 people of the province, parts of West Sepik and the Highlands provinces as well. Despite its rundown state and understaffing, the hospital continues to provide help to people. Mr Bird said with the K24 million proposed for Boram rehabilitation announced by Health Minister Michael Malabag during a recent visit, the hospital would continue to improve. Giving the status of the hospital, the chairman said the hospital was in the process of rebuilding and welcomed interested health workers to the province. He added that the plans to build a nursing college would go along to improving health manpower in the province. “We lack so much health workers, not only at Boram but right across East Sepik Province,” he said. Mr Bird, who had been chairman for only eight months, said with hospital acting chief executive officer in place, Boram had restored good governance and accountability. He assured the Government that the K24 million rehabilitation funds would be parked at the hospital accounts. Mr Bird said prior to his appointment, there had been reported malpractices at the hospital for a long time and these claims had been submitted to the auditor-general. He said it was time to restore public confidence. | Source: Post-Courier 09th March 2015

 

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH TRAINING FOR STUDENTS | By Maureen Gerawa Lack of vital information on sexual reproductive health and many other areas has given rise to many issues among young people. Thus, ChildFund Papua New Guinea, a non-government organisation which has been operating in Gulf and Central provinces, has initiated a project for young people on improving access to sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services in Central Province. Its second training under this project was conducted recently in partnership with Young Women’s Christian Association for 14 secondary schools and vocational centres. The training was from February 27 to March 3, and attended by 12 youth leaders and peer educators. YWCA facilitators, Sam Maila, Naomi Woyengu and Alex Tanabi, conducted training on SRH, HIV, human rights, gender issues, leadership and public speaking. ChildFund has a plan to have a follow-up training for more young people next year. It was noted that the facilitators were excited about going out to share the information with other young people in their schools and communities. | Source: Post-Courier 13th March 2015

 

DIABETES, HYPERTENSION CAUSES FOR KIDNEY FAILURE The leading cause of kidney failure seen at the Port Moresby General Hospital is diabetes and hypertension (high blood pressure). Both need serious attention, Dr Steven Bogasia, the hospital’s physician, said. Diabetes leads to many problems like heart failure, he said. Bogasia has been seeing many patients dying when their kidneys fail to function. “When the kidney fails, we offer palliative care, meaning we couldn’t’t do much to help the patient because to have the problem solved was to have a brand new kidney replacement, and available through kidney donors. And the replacement of the new kidney is done through surgery and it’s done overseas. If you go to Australia, you’re looking at almost half-a-million kina for kidney replacement. If you go to the Philippines or Singapore, it is K300, 000– K400, 000 alone for surgery and then you have other costs for treatment and you need to reside in those countries for follow-up treatment. Many times when we tell this to patients, it’s like giving them a final death note on the bed and many of them look depressed. We cannot do much but watch them die in the ward,” he said. Bogasia was a doctor-in-charge of a newly established non-governmental organisation, the PNG Kidney Foundation. |Source: The National, 10th March 2015

 

JUST A THOUGHT |

 

 

FROM THE MEMBERS |

 

LINK OF THE WEEK |

 

BLOGS TO WATCH|

www.atprojects-png.org/blogs

www.onemanthinkingallowed.wordpress.com

www.anglicarepngincblog.wordpress.com

 

ATPROJECTS NEWS |

ATPROJECTS STAFF ATTEND PERSONAL FINANCE COURSE | By Verolyn Frank A total of 34 ATprojects employees have attended a two days intensive course on Personal Finance Management at the National Appropriate Technology Centre last month. The course was to help and teach the staff on how to save and manage their income in order to meet their daily needs and to achieve their dreams in life. The course was facilitated by Hariah Frank, the head of the Accounts section and assisted by two accounts officers, Wolder Wifa and Yolanda Namo. The course was conducted in TokPisin targeting the TokPisin speakers. The English version of the course was conducted last year targeting English speakers and was facilitated by ATprojects Co-Director, Steve Layton. ATprojects Co-Director Steve Layton said this was part of Capacity Building for its employees to help them to be financially independent. Most employees are locals from the Nagamiza area and the course aimed at teaching them to improve their living standards and to achieve their long term plans. The course helped them to identify areas where they have been spending a lot of their income on. Everyone who attended the workshop was very pleased and thanked the local NGO for such an opportunity. Silas Simba, one of the ATprojects staff said the course will help him and his family to work towards archiving his dream.

He said that he should have attended the course a long time ago, adding that if he had done so he would have been half way through to achieving his dream. He said although he had lived half of his life already, he will try his very best to practice what he has learnt.

The Personal Finance course is one of ATprojects program that mostly targets low and average income earners to be financially independent to meet their daily needs and to achieve their dreams regardless of how much they earn. | Source : ATprojects Media Unit, 13th March 2013

 

POSITIONS VACANT |

TITLE Country Representative – Papua New Guinea SALARY Competitive INGO package LOCATION Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

 

EMPLOYMENT BASIS 3 years (subject to a 6 month probationary period) START DATE End of May 2015

 

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 31st March 2015

 

WaterAid is seeking to recruit a highly motivated individual with exceptional leadership skills to fill the position of Country Representative in Papua New Guinea (PNG). WaterAid is committed to supporting the Government of PNG to reach universal access to sanitation, hygiene and water and the Country Representative will lead development and implementation of our strategy.

 

Overview

WaterAid Australia works within a federated international NGO structure, and is the WaterAid international member responsible for managing country programs in South East Asia and the Pacific. WaterAid Australia has two established country programs, in Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea (PNG) and new programs are under development in Cambodia and the Solomon Islands. Through several key Australian Government grants, WaterAid Australia also supports a number of WASH programs in South Asia and Africa.

Accountabilities

  1. Represent WaterAid externally; ensuring that WaterAid’s vision, mission, values and aims are communicated in a positive and compelling way.

 

  1. Facilitate the building of relationships between government, private sector and non-government partners, staff and other stakeholders.

 

  1. In line with WaterAid’s global strategy, built on current analysis of WASH situation in PNG to implement a Country Strategy with a strong emphasis on advocacy and influencing.

 

  1. Recruit, lead, manage and develop the CP team, creating an environment that enables staff to maximise their potential.

 

  1. Ensure the successful, on time, delivery of multi-year plans and budgets. Identify future funding sources for the PNG Country Program.

 

  1. Lead the approach to ensuring that the CP has integrated gender, equity and inclusion into its work as well as being a diverse and inclusive place to work.

 

  1. Actively facilitate relationships between WASH sector stakeholders and actors in other related sectors (such as health and education) to support the development of the sector.

 

  1. Work in close collaboration with the Melbourne head office, in particular with the Regional Programs Manager and the Director of International Programs.

 

  1. Collaborate with colleagues from across WaterAid to enhance relationships and ensure effective organisational working.

 

  1. Contribute as a member of Global and Australian leadership teams of WaterAid to support organisational development; fundraising initiatives and community engagement activities

 

  1. Develop a thorough understanding of the external environment we are operating in, identify and manage risk including ensuring appropriate health and safety and security procedures are in place.

 

  1. Ensure that WaterAid’s global policies are adapted to the country context (as appropriate) and adhered to; represent WaterAid’s stated global positions on key development issues effectively, adapting them to the country context as appropriate.

Education

Essential Desirable

  • Degree or professional qualification in a relevant subject, • Qualification in international development • Post graduate qualification in a related subject • WASH related qualifications Closing date: 31st March 2015 (5pm Australian Eastern Standard Time)

Applications for this role must comprise of:

  • An application letter addressing the Essential Criteria outlined above (maximum 2 pages) • A curriculum vitae (maximum 4 pages). The CV must include three professional referees (referees will not be contacted until after interviews, with permission from the candidate).

If you would like further information about this position you can contact Mrs Nancy Haino-Valahu on 3254535. Interested candidates who meet the above requirements are to submit their applications to: nancy.hainovalahu@wateraid.org.au by close of business 31st March, 2015.

For detailed job description and recruitment information refer the WaterAid Australia website:

http://atprojects-png.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=996ceb0355222fb820fb1ba41&id=f47d801849&e=1f97bc9208

VIEW POINT |

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK |

I always enjoy getting your newsletter, (though the writing seems to be getting smaller and denser as I get older!). But I am sometimes concerned about the articles taken direct from newspapers with little analysis or comment. The second-to-last article (from Post-Courier) in your 6th March issue is an example of what I mean: PUSH FOR CROP DIVERSIFICATION. It sounds like a good thing for remote areas of ENB province doesn’t it? However, if you know the context, and the struggles that the people in the Baining and coastal areas of Open Bay have had with logging companies, aided sometimes by corrupt local officials, the proposed development of large scale agro-forestry is not so benign – as people elsewhere in ENB such as Pomio, can testify. Now that it is becoming harder for Asian logging companies to get legal permits to clear-fell primary forests, there is often an attempt to ‘dress up’ such forestry projects as ‘agro-forestry’ with the promise of planting oil palm, rubber, or some other crops to make people ‘rich’. Some of the 99 year SABLs leases have been found to circumvent PNG’s strong land laws, and are considered a foreign ‘land grab’ subject to an independent investigation. The real aim of these schemes is to make a lot of money out of logging pristine forest, and the companies involved rarely if ever, fulfill the stated aims of diversifying crops, or bringing long-term sustainable agriculture to the devastated lands they leave behind. The promised infrastructure, such as roads, fails to materialize, as temporary, poorly designed roads made for extracting timber, quickly deteriorate and return to muddy impassable tracks. The monoculture of oil palm cropping has adverse affects on both the local environment, on local landowners who have lost precious resources, and on the countries to which palm oil/kernels is exported, encouraging as it does, industrialization of farming practices in places like Australia and New Zealand. Either the Dept of Environment and “Conservation’ and Provincial Administration are being naive, or they have failed to learn from Pomio and other areas of ENB which have been logged for little benefit to local people, and who have suffered years of conflict over this issue. Locals protesting the destruction on their forest for two palm oil plantations have been terrorized by the police, beaten up and locked in shipping containers, bankrolled by the Malaysian logging company Rimbunan Hijau. I know that ATProjects’ newsletter has a disclaimer at the end, saying that not all the views expressed are those of the organization. However, with something as important as this, I think some ‘development’ commentary is necessary to fulfill your purpose in putting out the newsletter. Keep up the good work…..it’s a great source of information for many of us.

Wendy Lee

We’d love to get your feedback. We want to find out a little more about our readership, your opinion of the PNGDEV news service and your point of view about some topics. Please send your feedback to: info@atprojects-png.org

NOTICES |

DWU GRADUATION SET

Divine Word University is gearing up for it annual graduation ceremony at its Madang campus this Sunday 15th March where 764 students are expected to graduate. The small town of Madang is bracing for an influx of visitors for the ceremony which usually sees all hotels, lodges and guest houses booked out for the graduation weekend. The students graduating at the Madang campus would add to the 907 students who passed out of DWU’s amalgamated and affiliated campuses around the country, bringing the total for the 2014 academic year. This brings the total to 1670 graduates to have attained qualifications from DWU. The graduation ceremonies in the amalgamated and affiliated campuses took place towards the end of last year. The graduation on Sunday will feature students passing out of the full-time programs, part-time flexible learning programs and new nursing officers from the Lutheran School of Nursing in Madang, which is an affiliate of DWU. Twelve Solomon Islands students who studied through the flexible learning mode are expected to fly across to Madang from Honiara to graduate in person. The keynote speaker at the graduation will be the Ambassador of Japan to PNG, His Excellency Morio Matsumoto while the Ambassador of the Holy See, ApostolicNuncio His Excellency Most Reverend Archbishop Michael Wallace Banach will be the guest speaker. | Source: Post-Courier 11th March 2015

EVENTS |

TECHNOLOGY UPDATE |

SPC SUSTAINABLE ENERGY PARTNERSHIP BRINGS LIGHT AND LIVELIHOODS

Two villages in the Oro Province of Papua New Guinea, home to some 1200 people, began to enjoy the benefits of electricity over the weekend, thanks to their partnership with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) and a non-governmental organisation (NGO). Melanesia’s Million Miracle Partnership (M3P) is a launching pad for partnerships between community-based NGOs, government energy offices and local communities, especially women’s groups, to bring electricity to one million people in Melanesia (Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) by 2020. For Papua New Guinea, M3P aims to provide electricity to 82,500 households or 495,000 people by 2020. As an M3P partner, SPC sent a team from its Energy Programme to Papua New Guinea from 28 February to 13 March to install and commission a 12 Volt DC off-grid solar photovoltaic (PV) charging system for Kou Kou and Gorari villages. This, with 200 Solar Pico lanterns, will bring electricity to both villages, which are located along the Kokoda Track. The project is a collaboration of the Government of Australia and SPC working in partnership with the Kokoda Track Foundation (KTF) and the two communities. It was jointly commissioned by SPC and its project partners on 7 March 2015. One of the community leaders said, “My people are appreciative of SPC’s support and its partnership with KTF to bring this project to my community; this will provide solar lights right at the doorstep of my people. In the past we normally use firewood for cooking and also lights in the night. With the Solar Pico lanterns, we will have access to good quality lights and improve the livelihoods of my people.” This partnership serves to empower the women’s groups in Kou Kou and Gorari villages to effectively manage community-based micro businesses. They will run solar shops that serve as charging stations for the Solar Pico lanterns. The women leaders from both villages showed their appreciation. “This project is a blessing to the women; we will be able to earn money from the sale of solar lanterns and charging of the lanterns and also learn important business skills to operate the solar shop successfully. The project will improve the livelihoods of our families and empower the women in the area to run a small community business. The lights will improve the security of our families and also help our children complete their homework and study at night.” Kuini Rabo, officer in charge of M3P, said, “We are pleased to empower the women of Kou Kou and Gorari on the eve of the International Women’s Day. The M3P partnership was designed to empower women because we strongly believe in this year’s theme – Make it Happen – and no doubt these women’s groups will make it happen.”   The women will receive basic business and technical training from SPC and KTF staff. Similar projects are planned for Solomon Islands and Vanuatu in the coming months, and a hydro-electricity power supply project for 215 households in Papua New Guinea is in the pipeline. Source: Post-Courier 12th March 2015

 

SOLAR PLANE BEGINS EPIC JOURNEY

A record-breaking attempt to fly around the world in a solar-powered plane has got under way from Abu Dhabi. The aircraft – called Solar Impulse-2 – took off from the Emirate, heading east to Muscat in Oman. Over the next five months, it will skip from continent to continent, crossing both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans in the process. Andre Borschberg was at the controls of the single-seater vehicle as it took off at 07:12 local time (03:12 GMT). He will share the pilot duties in due course with fellow Swiss, Bertrand Piccard. The plan is stop off at various locations around the globe, to rest and to carry out maintenance, and also to spread a campaigning message about clean technologies. Before taking off, Borschberg told BBC News: “I am confident we have a very special aeroplane, and it will have to be to get us across the big oceans. We may have to fly for five days and five nights to do that, and it will be a challenge. But we have the next two months, as we fly the legs to China, to train and prepare ourselves.” -BBC news. | Source: Post-Courier 10th March 2015

FROM THE BUSH

 

WEEKLY FEATURE |

The above articles reflect a view of development that we are sure is not shared by everyone, but PNGDEV NEWS feels that everyone’s voice should be heard if we are going to truly develop. If you have any views on the above article why not share them with us by writing to info@atprojects-png.org

 

WEB SITE ADDRESSES | Oxfam International | www.oxfam.org.nz |ADRA PNG | www.adra.org.pg

|Anglican Health Service | Rural Airstrip Agency of PNG Limited [RAA] |

|www.raa.com.pg |www.facebook.com/RuralAirstripAgencyofPNGLimited |

|www.ahs-png.org ATprojects | www.atprojects-png.org ATCDI

||www.ngo.org.pg/atcdi ACIL | www.acil.com.au Australian

||Business|education.gov.pg/QL_HIVandAIDS/hivaids/health-promoting-schoo

|ls-teacher-guide.pdf|

|http://atprojects-png.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=996ceb0355222f

|b820fb1ba41&id=6045bf2d78&e=1f97bc9208

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PNGDEV NEWS CONTENTS

PNGDEV NEWS CONTENTS:
MEDIA WATCH | HEALTH UP-DATE | JUST A THOUGHT | FROM THE MEMBERS |LINK OF THE WEEK | ATPROJECTS NEWS | POSITIONS VACANT | NOTICES |EVENTS | VIEWPOINT| TECHNOLOGY UPDATE | FROM THE BUSH | WEEKLY FEATURE | WEB SITE ADDRESSES | SPECIAL NOTICES

Started in 2000, and is one of PNG’s oldest development newsletters. PNGDEV NEWS now has a circulation of 1,092 members, with an estimated readership of 4,368. ATprojects Inc. funds this newsletter so if you wish to support PNGDEV NEWS any contribution would be most welcome. Contributions can be sent to PNGDEV NEWS, PO Box 660, Goroka, and Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea.

MEDIA WATCH |
OFFICIAL: NO CLEAR PLAN ON WASH TARGET
The country will miss its medium development goal targets for water and sanitation this year because there is no clear strategic plan on how it can be achieved, an official says. Acting planning and monitoring Secretary Hakaua Harry said Cabinet had instructed the PNG Water Board (now Water PNG) to develop a national water policy but that was not carried out. The National Planning and Monitoring Department was then directed to chair a multi-agency task-force to carry it out. She said because of the lack of a strategic plan, more people were without access to water and sanitation. Access rates are the lowest in the Pacific region – below 50 per cent for both water and sanitation resulting in very poor WaSH health-related statistics. “PNG is off track to meet its WaSH existing targets representing a significant obstacle to becoming placed in the top 50 ranked human development index countries,” she said. | Source: National, 27th Feb, 2015

BOOMING POPULATION INCREASE IS A GROWING CHALLENGE TO PNG | By Alois Bai The rapid growth of Papua New Guinea’s population over recent decades is unprecedented and is receiving increasing recognition on the international development agenda. The PNG population is expected to exceed 10 million by 2020 at the current birthrate 2.7% a year, the highest of the six countries in Oceania. Countries with high fertility and population growth rates typically have high unmet needs for modern contraception, a fact that contributes significantly to population growth. Women who need modern contraception and don’t have access to it account for 79% of unintended pregnancies in developing countries. Voluntary family planning programs are critical due to the importance of universal access to contraceptive services for women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights. Family planning has many benefits and cost-saving effects. It enables women to exercise choice and control over their fertility while facilitating reductions in fertility levels and population growth. It also signals significant improvements in sexual and reproductive health, including reduced maternal and child mortality and morbidity. Ensuring women having the ability to plan and space their pregnancies is critical for advancing gender equality and it parallels women’s opportunities for education, employment and full participation in society. Countries with rapid population growth rates tend to have the highest levels of poverty, with great strain on public services which dramatically reduces the capacity of governments to meet citizen’s basic needs. Therefore reducing fertility rates permits greater investment in education, health and employment skills and contributes to community development and poverty alleviation. High rates of population growth exert pressure on the environment and resources such as land and water and heighten vulnerability to climate change. They can also heighten the potential for civil conflict and political instability, especially where there is pressure on limited land and water resources or mass migration and high youth employment. Reducing population growth by preventing unplanned pregnancies will increase the prospects and reduce the costs of PNG meeting its Millennium Development Goals and support progress towards other key development priorities.

PM O’NEILL: GOVERNMENT IS EMPOWERING GRASSROOTS TO ADVANCE THE NATION The Prime Minister, Hon. Peter O’Neill CMG MP, said the Government is changing Papua New Guinea for the better by empowering grassroots men, women and children of the nation. He made these remarks when launching the Nipa/Kutubu District Five Year Development Plan 2013-2017 at the Nipa Government Station in Southern Highlands Province yesterday. PM O’Neill said the right policies from the most effective Government in the history of the nation, was enabling people to improve their lives. “This government is investing in districts, provinces and ward councils, which is taking service delivery to the people of our rural areas. Grassroots people know what is needed in their areas and they must be included in decision-making processes. “Now councillors, village magistrates and court officers are funded by the Government, and this consistency facilitates leadership and decision-making at the local level. We will continue to strengthen the public service from the districts up to the national level.” The Prime Minister said the government is building new public servants’ houses, cleaning up problems in the law and order system, and providing opportunities for children to be educated and families to have access to healthcare. “Provinces are now receiving almost three billion kina each year for key impact projects. This is the first time in history of this country. For 40 years governments looked around for money as if we were one of the poorest countries in the world. Papua New Guinea had to beg for money from the International Monetary Fund, the Word Bank and countries like Australia. Now we have enough revenue, and we have proper management of how we spend this revenue for our people. Previously governments also put billions of Kina into trust accounts – but where has all this money gone? This must have been either stolen or mismanaged on so many bogus projects. These bogus projects were never delivered but were still needed in the country. Now you can look around and see the new projects being rolled out before your eyes,” PM O’Neill said. The launch was a memorable day for the people of Nipa/Kutubu, who gathered in thousands to witness the long-awaited occasion despite ongoing wet weather. The Nipa/Kutubu District Five Year Development Plan 2013-2017 enables the local level government to follow a roadmap, aligned with Papua New Guinea Vision 2050, that is aimed at enhancing ongoing development in the district. Accompanying the Prime Minister, were senior ministers including Works Minister, Hon. Francis Awesa MP, and Finance Minister, Hon. James Marape MP. | Source: Post – Courier, 05th March 2015

STUDENTS ENJOY NEW PIT TOILETS IN RURAL SCHOOL Papalealea Primary and Elementary School pupils have set up their water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) committee to take care of a project from Anglicare PNG through funding help from Water Aid Australia. Anglicare’s WASH project programme manager Issabella Warre said Papalealea was the second school in Kairuku-Hiri district, Central, that the organisation had provided modern pit toilets and hand-washing facilities to. She said through a partnership with the school, the student WASH committee was set up to look after the six modern pit toilets, two for elementary and four for primary students, a female shower room and 11 hand-washing facilities. Yesterday the four committee members made up of Grades 7 and 8 pupils – Esther Gata, Koari Heni, Maria Dere and Rova Maha – and two teachers were happy to have a team from an Australian non-government organisation visit. The team visited the school to see the effectiveness and benefit of the project in terms of improving sanitation and hygiene for students. Health teacher Wapu James thanked Anglicare and Water Aid Australia for the facilities provided. “Students took the responsibility to make sure the toilets are cleaned every day, as well as the drinking water and hand-washing areas,” she said. Research and evaluation manager Ben Ward who visited the school was impressed with students’ outstanding work in monitoring and keeping the facilities clean. Source: The National, 05th March 2015

NEW BRIDGE BRINGS RELIEF | By Zachery Per SOME members of the Paglau tribe living in Kerowagi, Simbu, are finally seeing vehicles at their village after repairs to a bridge damaged more than 20 years ago. The Tem Nigle Bridge has been repaired and upgraded with funding from Kerowagi MP Camilus Dangma and Simbu Governor Noah Kool. Project public relations officer Philip Kessy Wau said the temporary bridge and the upgrading of the road from Kerowagi station to Omugl village were welcomed by the people. The road upgrade will continue to Denge village on the border with North Waghi district in Jiwaka. He said the Tem Nigle Bridge was washed away more than 20 years ago. School children and public servants from the village faced difficulties in crossing the creek during rainy days. “We lost a young man who drowned and died recently. Another sustained a leg injury while trying to cross the creek,” Wau said. Village spokesman Aglua Paglau is happy to see vehicles in his village after 20 years. Although they live close to Kerowagi town, the road is cut off because there is no bridge. “The old access road connects Nondugl, in Jiwaka, to Kerowagi station but was left neglected,” Paglau said. “The road serves the people of upper and lower Dagle and Paglau tribes.” Simbu provincial administrator Joe Kunda, who visited the bridge, told the Omugl villagers that it should be ready in two weeks.| Source: The National, Thursday March 5th, 2015

ANGLICARE LITERACY PROGRAM ATTRACTS PEOPLE OF ALL AGES Anglicare Stop AIDS, a non-governmental organisation, begun a literacy program for people living with HIV/AIDS in early 2000, but today the program has changed its name to literacy for all because the people attending it come from varied backgrounds. They include successful businessmen and women who want to be able to write their own letters and sign signatures on cheque books rather than rely on someone else to do it for them. There were also parents pulling out their children from primary schools and taking them to these classes where they believed the children would learn better. The literacy program has four levels – one to four and the 105 people are one of two classes of level 1A which comprises people who had never been to school. There was also a class of level three that was in a building. Every day, these people have classes from 8am to midday and leave for others in levels two to four to come for classes in the afternoon. The latter include people who have not completed their schooling for various reasons. Eighteen-year-old girls Inau Ben and Augusta Mara from Eastern Highlands and Morobe provinces respectively said they had never been to school because of school fee problems but since they started coming for literacy classes, their parents, who were not keen in sending them to school before, were supportive, especially after seeing how much they have progressed in reading and writing. “I’m happy. I’m learning so many things here. I’m now able to read and write. Everything these days requires reading and writing so we have to learn these things,’’ said Ms Ben. Anglicare Port Moresby program manager Bernard Paru said Anglicare is helping complement the government because those who fall out of the formal system seek help there. | Source: Post – Courier, 04th March 2015

WINDS OF CHANGE IN REMOTE DISTRICTS | BY Isaac Nicholas in Mendi Winds of change are now blowing into some of the most remote districts, says Prime Minister Peter O’Neill. The Prime Minister, who led a high-level government team, said this when launching a number of multi-million kina projects in Nipa and Kagua in Southern Highlands Province. Mr O’Neill said K3 billion had been year to all districts and provinces each year and there was no reason why districts and provinces could not change. “For the last 40 years, we have been looking for money everywhere like we are poor. We go to International Monetary Fund, World Bank and Australia and beg. Now, we don’t have to beg. We have got enough revenue but we are not managing it properly. Billions of kina, not millions but billions parked in trust accounts, all have been lost or mismanaged, there have been a lot of con projects,” he said.” The Prime Minister said today money was put to districts and provinces.”Today the projects are in your face, you can see it. If an MP, Governor and even Government do not deliver, you can change that in 2017 election. If I don’t work, you can change me,” he told thousands of people in Nipa and Kagua. Mr O’Neill said this government will continue to do its best to develop the districts, provinces and country in during its term. “Our Government should continue to work hard every day. We have determination to change the country.” In Nipa, Mr O’Neill launched the Nipa-Kutubu five-year development plan, road sealing from Lai Bridge to Poroma turn-off, Poroma to Werin to Tindom Hill. He also allocated K 10 million for power from Hela border to Mendi. In Kagua yesterday he launched the sealing of Ialibu to Kagua and Erave road to connect to Kikori in Gulf Province. Mr O’Neill was accompanied by Ministers James Marape, Francis Awesa, Vice-minister Labi Amaiu and Governor William Powi. | Source: Post – Courier, 06th March 2015

HEALTH UP-DATE |
TEEN’S DREAM TO HELP IS SAVING LIVES | By Maureen Gerawa AN American teenager’s dream to bring help to Papua New Guinea has materialised and is today seeing lives saved in East Sepik Province. President and co-founder of Samaritan Aviation Mark Palm said yesterday that he first saw the need to work in PNG when he visited in 1994 as a 19-year-old. Samaritan Aviation, a not-for-profit organisation, is based in Colorado, USA, and through an exploratory work in early 2010, Mr Palm’s team decided to begin in East Sepik because of the great need. Since then they have saved 363 lives who would not have survived without these emergency evacuations. More than half of these life flights on its float plane were mothers and babies. Recently, he said they bought a second float plane with the help of US donors and Angoram MP Salio Walpio. The organisation is helping reduce the country’s high maternal and child mortality rates. They do not charge for any of the flights which are being funded by individuals and sponsors in the US as well as the East Sepik Provincial Government. Next week, Tuesday, March 10, will be five years since the organisation made its first evacuation of a mother on Good Friday on the Sepik River with a pregnancy complication who was unconscious and in critical condition. The 45 minute flight to and from the village resulted in an emergency surgery. Both she and her baby lived. She named him Mark. The quick flights are not only bringing critically-ill patients to the major hospital at Boram, but are flying medical supplies safely to the health centres and aid posts on timely basis. As the organisation celebrates its five years of operation, Mr Palm has used this occasion to thank the Government and non-government organisations and churches that have been its partners in the delivery of health services in East Sepik Province. | Source: Post – Courier, 06th March 2015

CATHOLIC HEALTH SERVICE CONTINUES TO PROVIDE BASIC SERVICES TO PEOPLE OF KIUNGA DARO DIOCESE This time in Kiunga Catholic Mission Urban Clinic the community health workers with Bishop Giles Cote of Kiunga Daru Diocese, North Fly Health Director John Larry, Catholic Health Service Secretary Sr Anna Sangimawa and Acting Health Secretary of Evangelical Churches of PNG Max Ako with other partners launched the TB Program to fight TB in the catchment area in Kiunga. The theme “A way forward in reducing TB in Western Province through advocacy on Behaviorally change back to the basic,” brings to light many important preventive educational measures that can be taken to fight the deadly disease. People from all settlements in the St Gerard Parish came to listen to what the health professionals using power point got for them about TB. According to the Catholic Health Secretary Sr Anna Sangimawa the aim of the awareness was to educate, advocate and show the people little basic preventive measures that can be taken to fight TB, and if those that have it, a way forward on getting treatment in hospital and clinic. Sr Anna said Multiple Drug Resistant TB (MDR) was their target within this two weeks to preach about and make it known to the people that Kiunga has no place for MDR TB. “Let’s take the basic steps to fight TB simply by taking preventive measures and quit the style of being ignorant,” Sr Anna said. She said the government has paid for the medicine and it’s free in clinics and hospitals it’s up to us now to take that responsibility to make health our business and work towards maintaining healthy lifestyle in our homes and families. She said her team of Community Health workers will be travelling to each house in the catchment area starting tomorrow to implement their program. Bishop Giles Cote while addressing the people urged the people to take Health as their own business. He said God has created us and has given us gift of life and Jesus Christ as our savior and we must look after our life and body. He thanked the Catholic Health Services and other partners for working together to fight health problems in the district and the province. North Fly District Health Director John Larry says TB is a bigger problem in Western Province and ranked third in the nation. Mr Larry said we must work together as partners to fight TB changing behaviour and attitude of the people. “We cannot bring new ideas, the best thing is education, behavior change, awareness, and continue to do house to house family awareness. He urged the people to take health as their own problem and work as a team to combat this disease. He also stressed on the government to help in providing more funding and logistic support to clinics, aid post and health centres to implement TB programs. However according to the power point presentation Western Province especially Daru has been reported with increasing number of TB cases and it’s spreading rapidly. It cost K8, 400 to treat a TB Drug Resistant TB Patient and this goes up to K38, 000 a patient for extensive drug- resistance TB and yearly 15, 000 cases of TB is recorded. Western Province is the third highest province with the highest number of TB and rising rapidly, as of December 2014, 153 drug resistant TB and on second line treatment in Western Province. | Source: PNGLOOP, 3rd Mar, 2015

KIDU SUPPORTS PROGRAM TO STOP MATERNAL MORTALITY RATE A STRONG advocate on maternal mortality says the issue of maternal mortality, maternal health and child health is not a health issue, it’s a social issue and a development issue. As the new patron of the new $10 million, five-year research program, Dame Carol Kidu is believed to be a new and influential supporter for Burnet Institute’s healthy mothers, healthy babies (HMHB) program, designed to address the appalling rate of death and disease among women and children in Papua New Guinea. “I’ve been a strong advocate on maternal mortality, not just in PNG but regionally, and I recognise that we are nowhere near reaching any of the targets that we are supposed to meet. The need for evidence-based approaches is critical, and I’m confident that Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies will inspire and assist enormously,” Dame Carol said. Dame Carol becomes the Patron of the new, $10 million, five-year research program, which aims to arrest a maternal mortality rate in PNG that’s one of the highest in the world and 80 times worse than Australia’s. She said but we need to remember that Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies is only the beginning of a long road. Communities need to take responsibility for the safety of mothers, and that includes men.” The only female member for the majority of her 15 years in the PNG Parliament, Dame Carol served as Minister for Community Development in the Government of Sir Michael Somare from 2002-2011. She also founded the Safe Motherhood Alliance of PNG with the aim to build sustainable solutions to the problems of child and maternal health. | Source: Post – Courier, 06th March 2015

LOCALS TO GET NEW HEALTH FACILITY| By Pearson Kolo A RURAL district in Western Highlands Province will have a new community health post with funding from the Australian Government and the Asian Development Bank. This is after Australian and ADB officers went to the rural district last Sunday and officiated at the ground breaking ceremony. During the groundbreaking ceremony in Alkena Tambul district, the minister and counselor for the Development Corporation of the Australian High Commission to PNG, James Hall, and ADB vice president administration and corporate management Bruce Davis told more than 2000 people that their organisations are there to help support the livelihood of people through such projects. “Our organisations exist to support people around the world to provide basic services and needs in their areas. This Community Health Post project in Alkena will provide all the basic health services to the people,” Mr Davis and Mr Hall said during their speeches. “Western Highlands Provincial Health Authority chief executive officer Dr James Kintwa who was also present during the ceremony thanked AusAid and ADB for jointly funding the Community Health Post project in Tambul. A water project, also part of the community health post project, was officially opened by Mr Hall. | Source: Post – Courier, 06th March 2015

MEN’S HEALTH PROGRAM UNDERWAY | By Haiveta Kivia Cutting off the foreskin of penis, insertion of foreign bodies and penis enlargements boils down to lack of men’s health programs right throughout Papua New Guinea. The PNG Sexual Health Society based in Port Moresby and its partners are trying their very best to promote Men’s Health Issues in PNG. It is one aspect of health issue not taken very seriously for a long time by the Department of Health, health care facilities and providers. The cross cutting issue, in regards to the foreskin cutting and ‘do it yourself’ penis enlargement practices, is that Man’s Health Issues, a health program specifically targeted for man and boys is non-existent. Lack of knowledge is playing a big part in the abuse and harm caused to many men and boys. Sebastian Robert, the Technical Advisor for Gender and Men’s Health at the National Department of Health, stated that an officer to deal directly with men’s health office was recruited three months ago. Mr Robert said the program is new in Papua New Guinea and his office was still drawing up guidelines, policies and recruiting personnel to roll out the program country wide. “It’s not easy as it may seem, trying to establish the program,” he said. He said the program will be holding its second consultative meeting next Wednesday. | Source: Post – Courier, 06th March 2015

JUST A THOUGHT |

FROM THE MEMBERS |

LINK OF THE WEEK |
Australia supports accredited Australian Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) to deliver cost effective, practical and direct poverty reduction programs through the Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP). In 2014-15, Australian NGOs will deliver over 600 community development projects in more than 50 countries, particularly the Indo Pacific region, reaching 23 million people. The ANCP will directly support community-level economic development, facilitating access to markets, improving livelihoods for women, and working to strengthen links between communities, government and the private sector.
To know more about the ANCP please click on the link below;
http://atprojects-png.us4.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=996ceb0355222fb820fb1ba41&id=4a29693524&e=1f97bc9208
http://atprojects-png.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=996ceb0355222fb820fb1ba41&id=19b909e3b7&e=1f97bc9208

BLOGS TO WATCH|
http://www.atprojects-png.org/blogs
http://www.onemanthinkingallowed.wordpress.com
http://www.anglicarepngincblog.wordpress.com

ATPROJECTS NEWS |
SCHOOL BENEFITS FROM WASH PROGRAM |By Janet Rowaro Fimito Primary School in the Eastern Highlands Province is the latest beneficiary to ATprojects School Water Sanitation and Hygiene [WASH] program funded by Oxfam [New Zealand]. The school is located 30 minutes out of Goroka town and caters for more than 200 students and a total number of nine teachers. With the maintenance of six ATLoo toilets installed back in 2005, installation of a 9000 litres tank and a 1000 litres tank to a girls shower house, the school had a re-opening ceremony last week 26th of February this year. During the reopening ceremony the Head Teacher of Fimito Primary School Aron Kameku was happy with the work and commitment that ATprojects had put into the school to complete the installation the facilities which included the tank water supply system and at the same time thanked Oxfam [New Zealand] for funding the project. Mr Kameku said the maintenance of the toilets will have a good impact on the lives of the students who on many occasions have been feeling ashamed to use the old rundown toilets. He said over the years him and his board of management had written several letters to the provincial government to secure funds to renovate the toilet facilities in the school but have been unsuccessful. He added that despite being located near the township of Goroka town the school had been neglected from basic services for quite a while until in 2013 when Digicel Foundation built a double classroom with solar lighting, installed one 9000 litre tuffa tank, two pit latrines and built a girl’s shower house in which ATprojects had complemented it by installing a 1000 litre tuffa tank. ATprojects Senior WASH project officer, Richard Longgar said it was during an assessment of the school facilities conducted towards the end of 2014 that ATprojects had decided to help Fimito Primary School as the toilet facilities installed back in 2005 had already deteriorated which were unhygienic to be used by the students. Mr Longgar told the students, teachers and parents to look after the facilities properly to ensure that they last long. He also challenged the teachers to encourage their students on the importance of health and hygiene practices in the classroom. “When students have proper toilets and water supply system in place in the school they will learn well in their classroom and it is also importance that teachers remind the students to wash their hands often after using the toilets. Now they do not have an excuse not to wash their hands because we have already installed a tap stand in a location that they can easily have access to,” he said. He said ATprojects through the support of Oxfam [New Zealand] aims to meet the needs for each of the schools that it works with and is glad that it is able to assist Fimito Primary through its services and urged the school board and parents, teachers and students to take care of the facilities well and maintain them as the responsibility now entirely rests on them. The school serves students from the surrounding villages of Ekepoka, Kamuka, Kafana and Lahamona which are located within the Goroka Rural Local Level Government Council. | Source: ATprojects Media Unit, 06th March 2015

POSITIONS VACANT |
EXECUTIVE MANAGER
Location: National Capital District, Papua New Guinea Coalition for Change PNG Inc. (CFC PNG) is a community based not for profit advocacy group launched in November 2007 to address the issue of gender based violence, particularly violence in the home.
CFC PNG aims to make a positive difference by working with organisations with similar aims to eliminate violence, and, to change the attitudes of individuals so that everyone, especially women and children are treated with respect and dignity. CFC PNG’s priority after it was formed was to seek legislative and policy reform to curb domestic violence. It prepared the draft Family Protection bill, which it submitted to the Government through the Department of Justice & Attorney General. On 18th September 2013, the National Parliament passed the Family Protection Act. The Family Protection Act makes domestic violence a criminal offence. It also provides victims of domestic violence the legal avenue to seek protection under it. The Act is gender neutral, which means, either spouse or partner in a heterosexual intimate relationship is entitled to seek protection under its provisions. The Family Protection Regulation is in the final stage of completion and CFC PNG is preparing to rollout awareness of the application of the Act, commencing in the second half of this year.

Role: Executive Manager
We are looking for a dynamic individual to lead Coalition for Change, into the next stage of the work on legislative and policy reform and to rollout our awareness programmes on the Act. That person must be one who believes in the right of every person to be free from fear, physical and emotional hurt caused by spousal and/or gender generated violence. The Executive Manager must be someone who is capable of leading a team of volunteers, and is able to foster professional relationships with the Government agencies, the business community, faith-based organisations, the international bilateral agencies, CFC PNG’s members and supporters. She /He is responsible for ensuring the overall efficient and effective implementation of all programs and the financial and the administrative functions of CFC PNG, as well as overseeing the professional and ethical conduct and activities of the organization, consistent with it’s vision, mission and business plan. Basic Qualifications: Minimum of a bachelor’s degree in Arts (majoring in Social Development) or Law with relevant training and work experience in human rights issues

Remuneration Package:
A salary package commensurate with the basic qualification and experience of the applicant will be offered.
CFC PNG is funded solely by its own fundraising activities and support from the private sector. If you are interested, please submit your written application. You can also obtain the full text of the Terms of Reference for the role of Executive Manager by contacting Ms Leslie Thomas on Telephone 320 0227 /313 1807 or email publications@cfcpng.org Applications will close on the 13th of March 2015.

VIEW POINT |
IS IT JUST US OR IS THE WHOLE WORLD STUPID? Francis Nii There are some things that human beings – to be specific Papua New Guineans – do that, when I consider them critically, I find to be so absurd as to wonder whether they have brains. There was this mother selling taro nicely creamed in coconut oil with spring onion and garlic puree. You could smell it from afar. Her grown-up girl came back from school and she was hungry. The mother gave her one kina from the money she had earned from the sale of the taro and told her to buy a bun known as dry scone. The girl grinned and walked to the nearest bun seller, got herself a dry scone and sated her hunger while other people bought taro from her mother for one kina and ate it with coconut milk and garlic and onion soup served on plate. A delicious and healthy snack. Another time I saw a woman selling oranges at our small market at the hospital’s front gate for K1 50. Her little kid came crying to her for something. Instead of giving the child an orange, the mother gave her a kina and told the kid to buy a bottle of Tang. The kid ran to the Tang seller and, wearing a broad smile, came back carrying a bottle of the sugary beverage. There is a fisherman from Wara Simbu who catches trout in the river. Each time he catches a big one, he sells it. With the money, he buys lamb flaps, an animal product classified as health hazard and unfit for human consumption in Australia and New Zealand. There it’s processed into animal feed but it also floods PNG supermarkets because dogs and Simbu fishermen likes it. I see many coastal people doing the same thing. They toil in the rough seas, fighting the wind, rain and sun, to catch fish to sell them at the market. After they sell everything, they buy lamb flaps and tinned fish full of additives and little quantity and take them home to eat. A mother and daughter sold English potatoes at the main market. In the evening they bought a packet of rice to take home. Before catching a PMV, they were in one of the Chinese fast food places eating potato chips. Whenever I think about these things, it makes me wonder which part of their body these people use for thinking. It can’t be their brains. And I wonder whether there are people like them in Australia, New Zealand and other countries or do we only have them in Papua New Guinea.

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NOTICES |
JOURNALISTS INVITED TO APPLY FOR UN FELLOWSHIP Journalists across Papua New Guinea are being invited to apply for a month-long Fellowship programme at UN Headquarters set to take place in New York City later this year. The Reham Al-Farra Memorial journalists fellowship program, which is open to journalists, aged 22-35, would provide a range of exclusive learning and networking opportunities to 15 successful candidates from around the world. The UN resident coordinator Roy Trivedy says this is a life-changing opportunity for any young journalist. “Giving a young journalist the chance to join other professionals from around the world in an intensive one month programme guided by international experts is an exciting prospect,” Mr Trivedy said. “Journalism plays a strong role in communicating the diverse work of the United Nations, and in addressing development challenges, so we are thrilled to support learning opportunities such as this for young professionals.” This year’s fellowship will also give participants a unique hands-on experience of the UN during one of the most significant times in the organisation’s 70-year history. “The Fellowship participants will be based in UN headquarters while the 70th session of the UN General Assembly is taking place. During this time we will see the global sustainable development goals being adopted – a truly momentous time in global development history,” Mr Trivedy said. The Fellowship is named in honour of Ms Reham Al-Farra, a young UN staff member killed in the bombing of the UN Headquarters in Baghdad. The program is sponsored by the United Nations department of public information as a fellowship program for junior and mid-level broadcasters and journalists from developing countries and countries with economies in transition. As of 2014, 536 journalists and broadcasters from 166 countries have taken part in the program. Interested applicants can request a copy of the application by contacting the United Nations Resident Coordinators office communications officer, Hannah Gleeson at Hannah.gleeson@one.un.org or by visiting in person level 14 Deloitte Tower, NCD Port Moresby. Stage one applications close at 9am next Monday. | Source: Post – Courier, 02nd March 2015

EVENTS |
WALK TO MARK WOMEN’S DAY
A peace walk is to be held in Port Moresby this Sunday as part of the commemoration of International Women’s Day. The walk will start at 6.30am but people are expected to arrive before 5.45am to register if they have not already registered. A global event, International Women’s Day, falls every year on March 8. It is an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of women and also call for greater equality. Soroptimist International Club of Port Moresby will host the Peace Walk which will start at IEA Ela Beach sporting grounds, toward Port Road and through Downtown, before finishing back at IEA Ela Beach sporting grounds. Soroptimist International is a global non-profit organisation which has programs for the advancement of young girls and women in the community. It has been operating in PNG since 2005. The organisation has three clubs – Port Moresby, Lae and Ramu – which are run by part-time volunteer members. Each of these clubs work on projects that include skills training for permanent jobs in areas such as retail and hospitality, as well as to empower women through fellowship activities and facilitation of outreach programs in rural community groups, such as Birthing in the Pacific Project (BIP). Soroptimist International Club of Port Moresby has 28 members and will continue to find ways to support empower and create opportunities for women by enhancing their opportunities for education and training for sustainable employment in Port Moresby. Everyone is welcome to join the walk. | Source: Post – Courier, March 2015

PNG IS INVITED TO SHOWCASE INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO ADDRESSING GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN UN HEADQUARTERS
A delegation from the PNG Public Service has been invited to UN Headquarters in New York to visit 9th session of the Commission on the Status of Women and present innovative approaches to addressing gender-based violence during the dedicated side event. Papua New Guinea is among 2 other countries – Guatemala and Argentina – whose work on gender based violence has been selected as an innovative intervention. The examples of this work include new SMS-alert system for violence victims and GBV service database system. The new SMS-alert system will connect human rights defenders from the communities to Family Sexual Violence Action Committee Secretariats in the provinces. Through free of charge SMS-system human rights defenders will be able to send requests for urgent assistance. The secretariats will be available 24/7, and will be responsible to providing appropriate support to the victims. The GBV service database will allow to collect reported cases and help to identify existing bottlenecks, monitor the response rates and provide insights to the extent of support needed for further planning. Both interventions are introduced by joint initiative of the Government of Papua New Guinea and UNDP. The delegation from Papua New Guinea will be headed by the Secretary of Department of Personnel Management, Mr. John Kali, and include representatives of his department, Department of Community Development and Religion, Family and Sexual Violence Action Committee and UNDP in Papua New Guinea. As part of the week-long visit the delegation will also have bilateral meetings UN Special rapporteur on violence against women Ms. Rashida Manjoo, representatives of the UNDP and UNWOMEN, Permanent mission of PNG to the UN and NGO working on preventing community-based violence in New York. “The UN fully recognises the efforts of the Government of PNG in complying with the responsibility to protect and promote the rights of women and girls. The Government has a commitment to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment. The fact that PNG delegation was invited to present its work on gender equality demonstrates that the world is interested in hearing about the progress that is being achieved in Papua New Guinea. The delegation will also hear about the work that is going on in other countries to protect and promote gender equality. We are looking forward to hearing about the delegation’s experiences on their return to Port Moresby and particularly about new ideas and solutions that can benefit the women of Papua New Guinea”, said Roy Trivedy, UN Resident Coordinator/UNDP Resident Representative. Side event “New partnerships for addressing and preventing GBV” where PNG delegation will make a presentation will take place on 13th of March and is organized by Korean Republic and UNDP. | Source: UNDP Media Unit, 05th March 2015

TECHNOLOGY UPDATE |
DATABASE TO ASSIST LLGS | By Abraham Avediba Proper multi-sector databases of villages is an important tool to assist the Government in delivering services to remote villages, says Social Impact Consultancy (SIC). SIC managing director Meredith Tutumang describes the multi-sector database as a record that would capture up-to-date information on various demographic, economic and agriculture activities that take place in a village and local level government areas. “Speaker of Parliament and MP for Finschhafen, Theo Zurenuoc, had assigned us to do a thorough finding and create a multi-sector database for Huon and Finschhafen districts of Morobe Province. “We’ve noted that about 80 per cent of people in these areas are dependent on government services, which in most cases, doesn’t reach them,” Ms Tutumang said. | Source: Post – Courier, March 2015

PM: ID REGISTRATION A MUST
EVERY Papua New Guinean must have their identity registered before they can access services such as free education and health care, Prime Minister Peter O’Neill says. He was in Kundiawa, Simbu, last Friday to open the first phase of sealing of the road from Kundiawa to Gembogl. “Free education and free health services will benefit those who have their identity registered,” O’Neill said. He called on all citizens to have their identities registered. O’Neill was the first to register his identity last week in his Ialibu-Pangia electorate in Southern Highlands. He had said the project was vital because it would allow the Government to know where it had to deliver services. “It is vital as it will cut down on the massive allegations of double voting, ghost name voting, underage voting and many other illegal voting systems experienced over the years,” he said. O’Neill said it would help the Government to plan for development. |Source: The National, Thursday March 5th, 2015

FROM THE BUSH |
PUSH FOR CROP DIVERSIFICATION
Crop diversification is one way to bring development into a remote area of East New Britain Province, with the agriculture concept of alternating forestry and agriculture, a forum was told. The public forum was organised to gauge views and grievances of the Makolkol people in the Lassul Baining area in East New Britain province on how the environmental plan can cater for their needs. The Department of Environment and Conservation, assisted by the provincial administration, is working to draw up an environmental plan to allow for a large scale agro-forestry integrated development project. The forum was to hear from the landowners and general public about the proposed agro-forestry integrated development project in the Makolkol timber resource area along Open Bay. The team said the initiative is a good one that would benefit the landowners because it does not only concern forestry but also alternate cash crops. | Source: Post – Courier, March 2015

WEEKLY FEATURE |
A PERSPECTIVE ON THE INFORMAL ECONOMY IN PNG |By Busa Jeremiah Wenogo By the end of this year Papua New Guinea’s national informal economy policy will have come to the end of its first five year implementation cycle. The policy was formally launched in February 2011 by then Community Development Minister Dame Carol Kidu. The enactment of the ground breaking Informal Sector Development & Control Act 2004 had necessitated the development of the policy. The lack of government budgetary support has made the road to implementation far from easy. In the face of this difficulty the policy has lacked the ability to support the bulk of PNG’s population who are engaged in the rural and urban informal economy. The lack of government support can be partly attributed to changes at the political level. Since Dame Carol Kidu lost the ministry after a change in government, the Community Development Department has seen its leadership change three times. Delilah Gore is its current Minister. However, this change at the political level might have been a blessing in disguise for policy implementation. With Anna Solomon’s appointment as the Acting Secretary the national informal economy policy gained much needed momentum. It is hoped that, with Ms Solomon now appointed as the permanent secretary, this will further advance implementation. Certainly her chairing of the informal economy sectoral committee of the CIMC (Consultative Implementation and Monitoring Council) in the latter part of 2013 saw implementation accelerating in strategic areas. These areas concerned providing public goods and services to enhance the growth of the informal economy as well as improving access to the unbanked population of PNG, most of whom are in the informal economy. Collaborating with the informal economy sectoral committee, Ms Solomon has been able to position her Department to undertake necessary reforms that complement stakeholder initiatives operating in various sectors of the economy. In 2013 and 2014 both CIMC and the Department of Community Development conducted provincial workshops on the policy in Alotau, Mt Hagen, Madang and Lae and there are plans for more consultations this year. Recently Ms Solomon expressed her desire for her Department to take full ownership and responsibility over the implementation of the national informal economy policy, something that was lacking in the previous administration. This has culminated in the establishment of a new Informal Economy Branch. This effectively elevates the policy’s status. The branch has a manager supported by a core staff of six people to support the implementation of the policy. This blossoming partnership between CIMC and the Department has led to the review of the Informal Sector Development & Control Act 2004. Led by the Constitutional Law Reform Commission (CLRC), 10 provinces have already been covered as part of a nationwide consultation process. The review is expected to be completed this year with a Cabinet submission. In the meantime, the Informal Economy Sectoral Committee has requested CLRC to allow it to vet the submission. The committee is concerned that, if CLRC repeals the law and introduces a modal law to be adopted by provincial and local level governments, this will create a big challenge for the Department of Community Development when it comes to coordination and administration. This is because many provinces and districts don’t have active community development officers at provincial and LLG levels and the Department do not have the capacity to monitor, coordinate and provide advice on the implementation of the law. In the area of financial inclusion, the Bank of PNG has been industrious in its efforts to increase access and improve the level of competency among marginalised and financially excluded people. So the future of the informal economy in PNG is brightening. Yet there are still challenges, including confusion about its role in the PNG’s overall economy. CIMC and the Department of Community Development have called on the government to clearly demarcate between the informal economy and the SME sector and in the process develop strategies to create a pathway for graduation. Both agencies believe this process should be driven through PNG’s experience rather than outside experience so it captures the homegrown issues affecting the transition of the informal economy into the SME sector. Development partners are slowly beginning to understand the important role of the informal economy in the socio-economic context of PNG, however there remains a great need for them to invest in the informal economy. These investments should focus on empowering women and ensuring that wealth generated from impact projects such as the PNG LNG is equitably distributed among PNG’s population. The PNG government should do the same so that these efforts can complement its policy to stimulate the growth of the SME sector in PNG. It is also strongly recommended that the government entrench informal economy policy in its medium term planning to ensure there is a sustained effort to support and grow the informal economy to address many of PNG’s socio-economic development issues.

The above articles reflect a view of development that we are sure is not shared by everyone, but PNGDEV NEWS feels that everyone’s voice should be heard if we are going to truly develop. If you have any views on the above article why not share them with us by writing to info@atprojects-png.org

WEB SITE ADDRESSES | Oxfam International | http://www.oxfam.org.nz |ADRA PNG | http://www.adra.org.pg
|Anglican Health Service | Rural Airstrip Agency of PNG Limited [RAA] |
|www.raa.com.pg |www.facebook.com/RuralAirstripAgencyofPNGLimited |
|www.ahs-png.org ATprojects | http://www.atprojects-png.org ATCDI
||www.ngo.org.pg/atcdi ACIL | http://www.acil.com.au Australian
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TRUE AS IT SEEMS - GOOGLE SPECIAL QUOTES

TRUE AS IT SEEMS – GOOGLE SPECIAL QUOTES

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